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Home > Events > Mary Anne Barkhouse & Annie Tung

Mary Anne Barkhouse & Annie Tung

 
136 Patrick Street
Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 5J8
T: (613) 580-2424

Posted by: Karsh Masson Gallery

 

Mary Anne Barkhouse was born in Vancouver, BC and belongs to the Nimpkish band, Kwakiutl First Nation. She is a descendant of a long line of internationally recognized Northwest Coast artists that includes Ellen Neel, Mungo Martin and Charlie James. She graduated with Honours from the Ontario College of Art in Toronto and has studied extensively with noted silversmith Lois Etherington Betteridge. She has exhibited widely across Canada and the United States.   Working with a variety of materials Barkhouse examines environmental concerns and indigenous culture through the use of animal imagery. A member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, Barkhouse’s work can be found in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, Mendel Art Gallery, Mackenzie Art Gallery, Art Bank of the Canada Council for the Arts, UBC Museum of Anthropology, Macdonald Stewart Art Centre, Banff Centre for the Arts and the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. In addition she has public art installations at Thunder Bay Art Gallery, University of Western Ontario in London, McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa, Macdonald Stewart Art Centre in Guelph, Haliburton Sculpture Forest and the Millennium Walkway in Peterborough, Ontario.  Barkhouse currently resides in the Haliburton Highlands of Ontario with two terriers and other assorted wildlife.
 Life at the edge of the forest is rarely idyllic. In the space where the wetlands meet the deep, dark wood, a thousand little soap operas occur. A bear cub ventures out of the bush only to be confronted by two snarling dogs. A weasel raids a duck's nest while two herons fly overhead, themselves looking for a place to eat. It is not only survival of the fittest  … attention to detail, and a certain amount of luck, is involved too.    As a year-round inhabitant, the fox bears witness to the struggles and successes of those that live, and die, in a space that embodies both luxury and desolation. The works in this exhibition are some of the things that the fox saw.

Thursday, October 6, 6-8 p.m.  Visit also gallery artist Anna Williams' exhibition opening,  Dark Timber, at the City of Ottawa's Karsh-Masson Gallery, 136 St. Patrick St., from 5:30 to 7:30 the same evening.

Mary Anne Barkhouse was born in Vancouver, BC and belongs to the Nimpkish band, Kwakiutl First Nation. She is a descendant of a long line of internationally recognized Northwest Coast artists that includes Ellen Neel, Mungo Martin and Charlie James. She graduated with Honours from the Ontario College of Art in Toronto and has studied extensively with noted silversmith Lois Etherington Betteridge. She has exhibited widely across Canada and the United States.   Working with a variety of materials Barkhouse examines environmental concerns and indigenous culture through the use of animal imagery. A member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, Barkhouse’s work can be found in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, Mendel Art Gallery, Mackenzie Art Gallery, Art Bank of the Canada Council for the Arts, UBC Museum of Anthropology, Macdonald Stewart Art Centre, Banff Centre for the Arts and the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. In addition she has public art installations at Thunder Bay Art Gallery, University of Western Ontario in London, McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa, Macdonald Stewart Art Centre in Guelph, Haliburton Sculpture Forest and the Millennium Walkway in Peterborough, Ontario.  Barkhouse currently resides in the Haliburton Highlands of Ontario with two terriers and other assorted wildlife.

Life at the edge of the forest is rarely idyllic. In the space where the wetlands meet the deep, dark wood, a thousand little soap operas occur. A bear cub ventures out of the bush only to be confronted by two snarling dogs. A weasel raids a duck's nest while two herons fly overhead, themselves looking for a place to eat. It is not only survival of the fittest  … attention to detail, and a certain amount of luck, is involved too.    As a year-round inhabitant, the fox bears witness to the struggles and successes of those that live, and die, in a space that embodies both luxury and desolation. The works in this exhibition are some of the things that the fox saw.

 

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