HomeContact UsBookmark Our SiteFrancais
About The ByWard MarketEventsMapsGallerye-MagazineBusiness Directory

 
Events
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
ByWard Market Events
Auto Classic
Charity Corn Roast
Oktoberfest
ByWard Market open for Canada Day
Celebrate Easter in the ByWard Market
All Events List
Email:

Home > Events > Prairie Scene Exhibitions

Prairie Scene Exhibitions

 
13 Murray Street
Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 9M5
T: (613) 241-2767

Posted by: L. A. Pai Gallery

 

Miriam Rudolph Prairie Narratives :  David Rice Sails
April 7 to May 7, 2011
Opening:  Thursday, April 7, 5:30 to 7pm.
Gallery hours:  Monday to Saturday, 10 am to 6 pm; Sunday, 12 pm to 5 pm
         &
Liberating Containment:  Richard Finney & Michael Hosaluk
Curated by LafrenierePai
April 8 to May 29, 2011
Meet the artists: Thursday, April 9, 5:30 to 7:30
Artist Talk, in English:  Friday, April 8, 12 pm.
Karsh-Masson Gallery, 136 St. Patrick Street, 613-580-2424
 
Both galleries will participate in the Prairie Scene Gallery Crawl:  April 26, 6 to 9 pm.
 
Miriam Rudolph    Artist's Statement
My prints are visual diaries that narrate my experiences and perceptions of different places I have been to. It is important for me to experience my surroundings very consciously, to be aware of details and to render the essence of a place in my artwork. Beneath the narrative of memories and perceptions lies the concept of my search for belonging that I experience after living in three different countries and cultures. My work shows places that I feel connected to and serves to document, to evaluate and to remember. I use a mapping method which has a lot of symbolic meaning for the search of belonging, because maps facilitate searching, way finding and revisiting. The map-like structure of my prints allows me to build up a narrative of different experiences simultaneously. Also inspired by maps is the repetition of similar shapes that resemble cartographic symbols. My prints about Winnipeg and Manitoba have become an important element in my connection with the prairies in making them my home. Biography
 
Miriam Rudolph was born and raised in Paraguay, South America. In 2003 she came to Winnipeg to study Fine Arts at the University of Manitoba; she graduated with a Bachelor in Fine Arts with Honours in 2007 and a Bachelor of Education in 2010. Miriam received several awards from the School of Art, including the Lynn Sissons Memorial Award (2006), the Heintz Jordan Printmaking Award (2006), and the Shanski Award in Fine Arts (2005). She also received several production grants from the Winnipeg Arts Council and the Manitoba Arts Council. Miriam currently lives and works as a printmarker in Winnipeg where she has had four solo shows and numerous group shows. Most recently she has shown her work also in Montreal and Washington.
 
David Rice-artist statement
When I am working, the physical, creative, emotional and intellectual parts of me are drawn together. Like metal through a rolling mill, these elements become highly focused until the work releases a response through the uninhibited expression of myself. It is satisfying to manipulate materials directly-sawing, cutting, filing-leaving an object that appears indestructible. A memorial. 
Jewelry is often purchased to celebrate important life events and rites of passage, like birth, marriage, graduations, anniversaries and other personal experiences. When the owner adds their memory to the object, the texture and markings that I have given the piece become a hieroglyphic language that symbolizes the event.  Ancient techniques, handwork and old, simple tools are juxtaposed with modern imagery and technology. I like to feel that the pieces are already ancient artefacts-created 500 years in the future.
 
Liberating Containment:  Richard Finney & Michael Hosaluk
From April 26 to May 7, 2011, Canada’s National Arts Centre presents Prairie Scene, the fifth in a series of festivals celebrating Canada’s finest artists.  Liberating Containment, a collaboration with Prairie Scene, presents exhibitions by Saskatchewan artist Michael Hosaluk, Acts of Chairs, and Manitoba artist Richard Finney, Urn and Reliquary Series.  The one exhibition is extensive and interactive with a performance aspect, whereas the second is an intensive exhibition of precious forms that are minutely detailed. 
 
Michael Hosaluk takes the chair as his point of departure, “liberating” it from its function by making it an outline building block.  The public is then invited to interact with the chair units to create larger sculptures, even to the point of taking a chair to plant it in a new environment, bursting beyond the specialized public space of a gallery into real public space.  Hosaluk’s chairs have been rescued by Saskatoon’s Fire Department from a thawing river and dismantled from a tree in the downtown core.  There have been many such acts of “Chairorism” that have gone on to inspire a play and short film.  Hosaluk notes:  "This exhibition will have an opening and a closing but no end.  The ideas generated for this show will stay with me for life, and will be reiterated in other ways and scenarios.  It has opened the doors to new thought and meaning in the work I do."    
 
While Michael Hosaluk’s sculptural work spirals outwards toward public performance, Richard Finney’s sculptures bind various layers of socio-political and historical meaning into highly crafted vessels of containment, the urn and the reliquary.  In Urns R Us, Finney observes the functional approach to funerary matters through the ministrations of mass marketing. ‘A can of Spam with its opening key for the lid was the main basis for the design of the container. This product was the first of its kind and was developed for the troops in the First World War which led to its widespread appeal. The key made it easy to open and was inexpensive to purchase.… I envisioned an urn that was for the masses, available in big box stores which would make it easily accessible to the general public. To get the consumers’ attention it would have to be flashy.  The “flash” gives it the bling factor which eases the public’s guilt for choosing a cheap burial option.’ 
 
Michael Hosaluk is recognized as one of the world’s most creative wood “turners”.  He is a member of the Royal Academy of Arts of Canada, the 2006 recipient of the Saidye Bronfman Award, and a lifetime member of the Saskatchewan Craft Council and the Saskatchewan Woodworkers’ Guild.  He is a founding member of the American Association of Woodturners and the Furniture Society of North America.  He has also received the Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Innovation in the Arts and the Lifetime Achievement Award.
 
Growing up on the western edge of Winnipeg, with farmland and prairie at his doorstep, Richard Finney’s artistic talents took on the sensuality of the prairies:  “Some of my earliest memories are about playing in clover fields, helping with the haying, fishing at a local creek, hand-raising small animals, and having a group of friends where creativity and imagination was part of daily life.” 

Miriam Rudolph Prairie Narratives :  David Rice Sails

April 7 to May 7, 2011

Opening:  Thursday, April 7, 5:30 to 7pm.

Gallery hours:  Monday to Saturday, 10 am to 6 pm; Sunday, 12 pm to 5 pm        

&

Liberating Containment:  Richard Finney & Michael Hosaluk

Curated by LafrenierePai

April 8 to May 29, 2011

Meet the artists: Thursday, April 9, 5:30 to 7:30

Artist Talk, in English:  Friday, April 8, 12 pm.

Karsh-Masson Gallery, 136 St. Patrick Street, 613-580-2424 

Both galleries will participate in the Prairie Scene Gallery Crawl:  April 26, 6 to 9 pm. 

Miriam Rudolph    Artist's Statement

My prints are visual diaries that narrate my experiences and perceptions of different places I have been to. It is important for me to experience my surroundings very consciously, to be aware of details and to render the essence of a place in my artwork. Beneath the narrative of memories and perceptions lies the concept of my search for belonging that I experience after living in three different countries and cultures. My work shows places that I feel connected to and serves to document, to evaluate and to remember. I use a mapping method which has a lot of symbolic meaning for the search of belonging, because maps facilitate searching, way finding and revisiting. The map-like structure of my prints allows me to build up a narrative of different experiences simultaneously. Also inspired by maps is the repetition of similar shapes that resemble cartographic symbols. My prints about Winnipeg and Manitoba have become an important element in my connection with the prairies in making them my home.

Biography Miriam Rudolph was born and raised in Paraguay, South America. In 2003 she came to Winnipeg to study Fine Arts at the University of Manitoba; she graduated with a Bachelor in Fine Arts with Honours in 2007 and a Bachelor of Education in 2010. Miriam received several awards from the School of Art, including the Lynn Sissons Memorial Award (2006), the Heintz Jordan Printmaking Award (2006), and the Shanski Award in Fine Arts (2005). She also received several production grants from the Winnipeg Arts Council and the Manitoba Arts Council. Miriam currently lives and works as a printmarker in Winnipeg where she has had four solo shows and numerous group shows. Most recently she has shown her work also in Montreal and Washington.

David Rice-artist statement

When I am working, the physical, creative, emotional and intellectual parts of me are drawn together. Like metal through a rolling mill, these elements become highly focused until the work releases a response through the uninhibited expression of myself. It is satisfying to manipulate materials directly-sawing, cutting, filing-leaving an object that appears indestructible. A memorial. Jewelry is often purchased to celebrate important life events and rites of passage, like birth, marriage, graduations, anniversaries and other personal experiences. When the owner adds their memory to the object, the texture and markings that I have given the piece become a hieroglyphic language that symbolizes the event.  Ancient techniques, handwork and old, simple tools are juxtaposed with modern imagery and technology. I like to feel that the pieces are already ancient artefacts-created 500 years in the future.

Liberating Containment:  Richard Finney & Michael Hosaluk

From April 26 to May 7, 2011, Canada’s National Arts Centre presents Prairie Scene, the fifth in a series of festivals celebrating Canada’s finest artists.  Liberating Containment, a collaboration with Prairie Scene, presents exhibitions by Saskatchewan artist Michael Hosaluk, Acts of Chairs, and Manitoba artist Richard Finney, Urn and Reliquary Series.  The one exhibition is extensive and interactive with a performance aspect, whereas the second is an intensive exhibition of precious forms that are minutely detailed.

Michael Hosaluk takes the chair as his point of departure, “liberating” it from its function by making it an outline building block.  The public is then invited to interact with the chair units to create larger sculptures, even to the point of taking a chair to plant it in a new environment, bursting beyond the specialized public space of a gallery into real public space.  Hosaluk’s chairs have been rescued by Saskatoon’s Fire Department from a thawing river and dismantled from a tree in the downtown core.  There have been many such acts of “Chairorism” that have gone on to inspire a play and short film.  Hosaluk notes:  "This exhibition will have an opening and a closing but no end.  The ideas generated for this show will stay with me for life, and will be reiterated in other ways and scenarios.  It has opened the doors to new thought and meaning in the work I do."

While Michael Hosaluk’s sculptural work spirals outwards toward public performance, Richard Finney’s sculptures bind various layers of socio-political and historical meaning into highly crafted vessels of containment, the urn and the reliquary.  In Urns R Us, Finney observes the functional approach to funerary matters through the ministrations of mass marketing. ‘A can of Spam with its opening key for the lid was the main basis for the design of the container. This product was the first of its kind and was developed for the troops in the First World War which led to its widespread appeal. The key made it easy to open and was inexpensive to purchase.… I envisioned an urn that was for the masses, available in big box stores which would make it easily accessible to the general public. To get the consumers’ attention it would have to be flashy.  The “flash” gives it the bling factor which eases the public’s guilt for choosing a cheap burial option.’

Michael Hosaluk is recognized as one of the world’s most creative wood “turners”.  He is a member of the Royal Academy of Arts of Canada, the 2006 recipient of the Saidye Bronfman Award, and a lifetime member of the Saskatchewan Craft Council and the Saskatchewan Woodworkers’ Guild.  He is a founding member of the American Association of Woodturners and the Furniture Society of North America.  He has also received the Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Innovation in the Arts and the Lifetime Achievement Award.

Growing up on the western edge of Winnipeg, with farmland and prairie at his doorstep, Richard Finney’s artistic talents took on the sensuality of the prairies:  “Some of my earliest memories are about playing in clover fields, helping with the haying, fishing at a local creek, hand-raising small animals, and having a group of friends where creativity and imagination was part of daily life.” 

 

Hours of Operation

Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. Sun.

Map